Selling Soulfully with Jennifer Allan

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Political Pontificating on Facebook... Yea? Or Nay?

In the comments on my post yesterday about What to Do (and not do) on Facebook, Robert Hicks mentioned that he "gets a little too political" in his Facebook conversations and implied that he might need to tone it down. 

I have some thoughts on the matter... I hope you don't mind if I share...

I lean toward the conservative side of the aisle. Not 100% - I couldn't care less who marries whom or changes their body parts to suit them, but generally, yeah, I'm a right-winger. 

(Lefties, are you already getting a bit ruffled? Fellow right-wingers, do you like me a little more now? Ah, we'll get to that). 

Sometimes when I'm surfing my newsfeed and see an opinionated post from a liberal friend, I get a bit irritated. Not because I don't respect his or her right to his or her opinion, but rather because political posts tend to imply (or outright state) that the "other side" is stupid. And when I'm on the "other side," I feel insulted. And when I feel someone has insulted me, I tend to not like that. Further, since I don't agree with my liberal friend's opinion, I might even think a bit less of his or her intelligence, because, well, I think they're wrong! 

(Stay with me here.)

So, it seems that if that is the case, it would be wise for a self-employed person (for example, a real estate agent) to avoid political pontifications and stick with discussing the weather, what they had for breakfast or their most recent listing. 

Right? Right?? 

Not so fast. 

Sometimes when I'm surfing my newsfeed and see an opinionated post from a conservative friend (as long as they aren't bashing marriage freedom or B/C Jenner), I perk up. I smile. I might even comment positively. And, go figure, I feel complimented because this FB friend o'mine is implying that I'm smart because I agree with him/her AND since I do agree, I think a little bit higher of my FB friend as well! 

So, if THIS is the case, it seems it would be wise for a self-employed person to embrace political pontifications...?

Hmmmm, what to do, what to do?

Your choice! Think about it... if you have strong political views, doesn't it make sense that you might connect better with people who think along the same lines? (however right or wrong you may be, JUST KIDDING). And, further, that you might have "issues" with folks who have equally strong views that conflict with yours?

So perhaps... just perhaps... political pontificating might be a fantastic way to attract the perfect clients for you!?

Thoughts? 

 

Somewhat Related Blogs:
Is Transparency a Good Thing in Your Personal Marketing?
Should You Take Real Estate Advice from a Republican?

 

 

It's Here!

 

The More Fun You Have Selling Real Estate, the More Real Estate You Will Sell! 
(True Story)
Order Your Here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comment balloon 120 commentsJennifer Allan-Hagedorn • October 19 2015 02:23PM
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